At Karnak Temple

Tourist carriage outside Karnak Temple, our next site to visit. This horse was having trouble eating from its feed bag.

At Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple is the largest religious complex ever built, covering over 200 acres. It was built over a period of 2,000 years, starting in the 11th Dynasty (2055), and it was dedicated to the Theban triad of Amen, Mut, and Khonsu. It consists of a number of temples, chapels, pylons, and other buildings.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Scale model of the Karnak Temple.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

The First Pylon, built in 656 BC.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

A mosque outside the temple, built much later.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

There were originally three Avenues of Sphinxes, one which was two miles long, linked to the Avenue of Sphinxes at the Luxor Temple of Thebes.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

The ram–headed sphinx was a symbol of the god Amun.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

The sphinx on the other side of the walkway.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Close–up of one of the sphinx.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Entranceway to a courtyard.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Through the gate: more sphnixes.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Close–up of the sphinxes.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

A close–up of the sphinx in the best condition.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

The Second Pylon leads to the Hypostyle Hall (hypostyle = supported by columns) built by Seti I and his son Ramses II.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

More of the temple.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

The Colossus of Ramses II stands in front of the entrance to the Great  Hypostyle Hall.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

The bottom of the statue.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Another statue here.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

The Great Hypostyle Hall, supported by 134 gigantic columns, with one of the obelisks in the background. This hall at 54,000 square feet  is the largest room of any religious building in the world.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

The columns.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Hieroglyphics on a column.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

More of the columns.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

You can still see some of the original paint here.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

And here as well.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

And here as well.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

More of the Giant Hypostyle Hall.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Another statue.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Two obelisks. I believe the one on the right is that of Queen Hatshepsut.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Close–up of the obelisk.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

The other obelisk.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

This photos shows the temple’s original building bricks and also the reconstruction being done on them.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Photo showing newly even bricks before the final coating has been put on them.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Pylon of Thutmose III, which is being reconstructed.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Wider view of the temple.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

View of the obelisks.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

I cannot find any reference to this sculpture, but it was there. It does look out of place.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

I don’t think this was a fallen obelisk, but, rather, one that hadn’t been put up yet.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Another gateway.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

More statues.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

It looks like these statues were in front of another pylon.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Statues on the left.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

The statues on the right.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Outer wall in front of the obelisks.

Karnak Temple

The Step Pyramid of Djoser

One more view of the step pyramid with another dog family playing.

The Step Pyramid of Djoser

Karnak Temple

Puppy dogs near the outside of the temple. They were having a great time running after each other up and down the stones. We saw cats and dogs at many of the temples and they all looked very healthy.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Mommy dog gathering her pups together.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Walking out of the temple behind the sphinxes.

Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Close–up of the best–preserved sphinx.

Karnak Temple

Leaving Karnak Temple

Seen walking back to the bus from the temple.

Leaving Karnak Temple

On the Way Back to Our Boat

A Coptic Christian church. I took a photo of this last night but this one is better.

On the Way Back to Our Boat

On the Way Back to Our Boat

Another Coptic Christian church right next door to the one in the previous photo.

On the Way Back to Our Boat

On the Way Back to Our Boat

Passing the Luxor Temple at Thebes. Some of us hit the Internet cafe before going back on our boat so we could e–mail home. When we started our journey from the boat docked nearest to the pier, which was a restaurant boat, we got a very pleasant surprise when we entered the second boat––it was our boat. While we were at the temple, the boats rearranged themselves, making us second in line. We were leaving early tomorrow and our position certainly made it easier for the porters to carry our suitcases to the pier. Tomorrow we would fly from Luxor back to Cairo.

On the Way Back to Our Boat